Featured Article/Papers: .....In this Edition..... for IJM Vol. 19, No. 1, 2017

In this Edition ...

 

A Nigerian cross-sectional community-based study assesses the knowledge and practices of birth preparedness and complication readiness (BPACR) among pregnant women in Benin City, for improved antenatal care (ANC) registration and skilled attendance at birth.

 

The mean age of women studied was 28.9 ± 4.9 years, 197(78.2%) of them were aware of the term “birth preparedness” with health care providers 172 (89.1%) reported as their main source of information. Majority 243(96.4%) of respondents had good knowledge of birth preparedness and complication readiness (BPACR) while 9(3.6%) had fair knowledge. In relation to practice of BPACR, 238(94.4%) had registered for ANC, 234(98.3%) had identified a health facility, 233(92.5%) identified a skilled birth provider, 165(65.5%) made transportation plans, 74(29.4%) had savings as emergency fund while only 21(8.3%) had identified potential blood donor. ANC registration (OR=0.30; 95%CI= 0.09-0.98; p=0.04) and Identifying skilled birth provider (OR=0.18; 95%CI= 0.06-0.49; p < 0.01) among respondents were significant predictors identified influencing health facility deliveries. See pages 36 to 42.

 

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

A Pakistani descriptive study assesses the knowledge of health care providers in the management of intimate partner violence victims as they can play a significant role in screening and identification of intimate partner victims.

 

The findings revealed that 71.6% health professionals had background knowledge of intimate partner violence, 98% had received no training during their professional lives, while 5% had knowledge about universal screening. Though majority of the health professionals were aware of the special needs of the victims, 88.3% respondents claimed that there was no policy for screening and managing abused women. Participants (63%) believed in legal documentation but no public display of posters or training program was being run by the hospital. See pages 30 to 35.

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

A Saudi Arabian educational review identifies the areas of weakness in Saudi’s dental education curriculum and suggests suitable learning approaches to be incorporated to improve the dentistry education in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

 

With some of the identified areas of weaknesses in the curriculum and with the current advances in new knowledge and technology, there may be a need for incorporating innovative teaching and learning methods in Saudi Dental education, with a possibility of introducing it in the new dental schools. The results of this literature review were limited to Undergraduate dental education curriculum only. See pages 43 to 48.

 

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

A UK clinical review discusses the public health perspective of the potential link between schizophrenia and violence, including the initiatives taken both nationally and internationally to tackle stigmatisation and discrimination.

 

The concept of schizophrenia and violence pose a considerable burden not only on patients and families, but also on society and the economy – both at the national and international level. Targeted and generalised initiatives, such as antistigma campaigns, are implemented to highlight mental health problems at both national and international levels. See pages 49 to 54.

 

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

A clinical review discusses the public health and clinical issues affecting mental health practice in primary care. A mental disorder or mental illness is a psychological or behavioural pattern that occurs in an individual and is thought to cause distress or disability that is not expected as part of normal development or culture.

 

At various stages of history and civilisation, different reasons have been attributed as to the cause of this affliction. The role of public health is to contribute ‘to the health of the public through assessment of health and health needs, policy formulation, and assurance of the availability of services’. This would increase awareness and help in decision making. Mental disorders are common and affect all of us at some time; if not ourselves directly, then friends, family or work colleagues may be affected at some point in their lives. Most people who suffer from mental disorders and who receive care from the health service do so in primary care. Mental health problems are now implicated in one in four primary care consultations in the UK, making mental health consultations second only to those for respiratory infections. Depression is the third most common reason for consultation in UK general practice. While most people suffer from mild conditions and recover quickly, a significant proportion suffers from chronic conditions that cause moderate or high disability, with other co-morbidities. There are need for better commissioning and education in primary care. See pages 19 to 25.

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

A UK systematic literature review examines the epidemiological issues of diabetes in the global community.

 

In 2016, 9.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes internationally. In 2014 diabetes was the direct cause of about 2.0 million deaths and high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.4 million deaths Worldwide. Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. See Pages 13 to 18.

 

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

A UK based study quantifies time savings a Tablet device can provide in a clinical setting. This is in comparison to the use of paper folders for looking up results on ward rounds, which are maintained daily with stationary PC’s.

 

The Tablet takes an average of 0.88s (+/- 0.14s 95%CI) to look up blood results. This saves roughly five seconds per patient (p<0.01) in comparison to the folders. The device also takes an average of 1.98s (+/- 0.93s 95%CI) to look up radiology results, and saves 23 seconds per patient (p<0.01).

The paper folders take on average 128.13 minutes per day to be maintained (p<0.01), with a margin of error of 62.1 minutes (95% CI). This equates to roughly 15 hours of work per week that the Tablet device negates the need for.  See Pages 26 to 29.

 

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

For more information about the above articles, please contact us at: publications@iahcp.org.uk or complete the contact form below, quoting the page numbers so that more information on how to obtain them or the full texts can be provided.

 

Your form message has been successfully sent.

You have entered the following data:

Contact form

Please correct your input in the following fields:
Error while sending the form. Please try again later.

Note: Fields marked with * are required

IJM UK Office

International Journal of Medicine (IJM):

 

Publications Services

Kemp House, 152 City Road

London EC1V 2NX, UK

 

Or use our contact form.

News

Available now: delivery service!

We can now deliver Journals and books straight to your door!

 

 

 

Print Print | Sitemap
© International Journal of Medicine (IJM) 1957 to 2017